Las Vegas, Catalonia, Puerto Rico: Your Monday Evening Briefing


Despite the violence, he says 90 percent of the 2.3 million people who cast ballots voted to secede. The central government disputes the vote’s validity and has threatened to use its emergency powers to prevent a breakaway state.

Pressure is increasing on the European Union to mediate, but at a time of rising nationalism and populism, the last thing the bloc wants is to encourage regional separatism.

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Kirsten Luce for The New York Times

3. A surge of desperately needed supplies has begun to arrive in parts of storm-ravaged Puerto Rico. We made it to the remote island of Vieques, where the solitude of undeveloped beaches used to be a key component of the allure.

Now that isolation is a big problem for the 9,000 people living there. They’ve been largely cut off from the world for 11 days, with no power or communications and, for many, no running water.

“We lost everything,” said a young mother whose home was destroyed. “It’s hell.”

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4. Russia’s disinformation campaign during the 2016 presidential election included Facebook accounts disguised as gun rights and gay rights advocates — even one focused on cute puppies.

Facebook, which handed over 3,000 Russia-linked ads to congressional panels today, says it’s “deeply disturbed” about the ads.

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Daniel Chan/Associated Press

5. The trial in Malaysia for the two women accused of killing the half brother of Kim Jong-un is being closely watched for clues about the workings of North Korea. Above, one of the suspects.

Our Tokyo bureau chief examines whether a nuclear deal with the North is a mission impossible for Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

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Chinese University of Hong Kong, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

6. Three American scientists won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for discovering the molecular mechanisms controlling the body’s daily cycle.

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young used fruit flies to “peek inside our biological clock” and explain how plants, animals and humans synchronize “with the Earth’s revolutions.” Above, the three in 2013.

More Nobels will be announced over the next week. Tomorrow is physics, followed by chemistry, literature, peace, and, next Monday, economic science.

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Aly Song/Reuters

7. General Motors is making moves toward an emissions-free future.

The company said it would introduce 20 new all-electric models by 2023, including two in the next 18 months.

There’s no end date in sight for its production of gasoline-engine vehicles, though. And in a speech in Shanghai last month, the company’s chief executive, Mary Barra, above, argued that the switch should be driven by consumers, not regulators.

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Ashley Gilbertson for The New York Times

8. KFC is in the midst of a huge expansion in Africa — at the same time that obesity and related health problems are surging. We went to Ghana, where the obesity rate has gone from 2 percent to 13.6 percent since 1980.

In addition to being tasty, KFC is seen as a status symbol there. “It’s like I’m in Germany or Canada. Everything is very nice,” one young customer explained.

But nutrition experts are worried about an increasingly unhealthy population, without the medical resources to address a looming crisis.

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Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

9. Finally, here’s what we learned from Week 4 of the N.F.L. season: The Rams have found their defense, Cam Newton found his old self, and the Texans found their quarterback.

And President Trump’s criticism hasn’t stopped players from protesting during the national anthem. Here’s what each team did on Sunday.

Our columnist says that as players are judged for their postures during the anthem, it might be fair to turn the lens on the fans, particularly those in line for the restroom or at the concession stand as it plays. Above, some fans during the anthem at yesterday’s Cardinals-49ers game.

Have a great night.

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Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.

And don’t miss Your Morning Briefing, posted weekdays at 6 a.m. Eastern, and Your Weekend Briefing, posted at 6 a.m. Sundays.

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