Travel

An Olympic Challenge: Eat All the Korean Food That Visitors Won’t

In our conversation, David Chang said it had been frustrating at times to see that Korean food — beyond bibimbap, barbecue and kimchi — was still so inscrutable for so many people he encountered during the Olympics. Among his pet peeves, he said, was how non-Koreans used Japanese names to describe Korean dishes: Hwe, sliced raw fish, is not sashimi, ...

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In Search of Lost Time in Europe’s Sanatoriums

Also connected to that culture was a parallel institution that flourished in Europe around the turn of the century: the thermal spa. Since the 1800s, doctors had been prescribing hydrotherapy, and health resorts were being established across the continent. As the historian David Clay Large has written, “the grand spas in their heyday amounted to their world’s equivalent of today’s ...

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A Museum Bridges the Divide Between Two Bordeaux

The few wine museums I have visited around the world have never quite fired the imagination. The more ambitious the museum, the more transparently promotional it is for a particular region, a certain producer or the benefits of wine. The most successful have been the most local, which have simply presented artifacts without forced narratives. But La Cité consciously avoids ...

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A Complex Red Bean Stew From Georgia

And the beans! Mottled red kidney beans boiled until velvety soft and mashed with pungent raw garlic, browned onions and a thrilling-sounding mountain herb called blue fenugreek. Photo This comforting stew is a vegetarian feast. Credit Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times While I couldn’t get my hands on spectacular Georgian tomatoes or those creamy Tushetian potatoes, I could ...

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At a Yoga Retreat in India: Beach Walks, Body Treatments and Healing

We handed our questionnaires back to Ms. Suofsky and Ms. Minhas Singh, who announced that along with three body treatments, our retreat included a consultation with an ayurvedic doctor. The doctor would be tailoring our treatments after identifying our dosha — the Sanskrit term used for a person’s biological constitution, which is made up of a combination of elements: vata ...

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Floyd Cardoz Pivots Again, for an Elusive Ingredient: Fun

So he’s making a course correction: Paowalla will close after service on Saturday and soon reopen in the same location as the Bombay Bread Bar. It will be, he says, a more colorful, stripped-down and affordable place, where Mr. Cardoz is hoping he can do for Indian cuisine in New York what restaurants like Ugly Baby and Uncle Boons have ...

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A Chinatown Noodle Dynasty Returns in Style

Chien Lieh Tang is the chef at the resurrected Hwa Yuan, and although his cooking is not hard to appreciate, a little orientation may help. First, a warning: Those who believe that the only good Sichuan food makes you weep, sniffle, moan, call 911 or crawl under the table will need to adjust their standards. Hwa Yuan serves many family ...

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A New Shuttle Service, Minus the 1980s Frills

But like its predecessors, the new service is targeted at business travelers. “These were unique opportunities,” Mr. Mann said, “to do something that was much more generous than you would typically get.” Eastern Air Lines was the first to operate air shuttles, beginning in 1961, with service every other hour from La Guardia to Washington and Boston. Over the next ...

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Art Looted by Nazis Gets a New Space at the Louvre. But Is It Really Home?

“Museums have really undergone a cultural revolution,” said Corinne Bouchoux, a former senator who wrote a 2013 report on France’s handling of looted artwork. “We’ve gone from an era where these paintings were either hidden or forgotten, to one where this history is accepted.” “But for the paintings that we are certain were despoiled, the real question is: What is ...

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Two Cities, Two Countries, Common Ground

The land was not part of the original territory gained by the Americans at the end of the Mexican War, but the United States government acquired it in 1853, through the Gadsden Purchase, to build the southern transcontinental railway line. Foreseeing the boon in international commerce that intersecting railroads could bring, two Russian brothers named Jacob and Isaac Isaacson set ...

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