Health

‘Opiophobia’ Has Left Africa in Agony

Early Opposition In a telephone interview from Scotland, Dr. Merriman, sometimes called Uganda’s “mother of palliative care,” described the early days of mixing morphine powder imported from Europe in buckets with water boiled on the kitchen stove. Once cool, it was poured into empty mineral water bottles scrounged from tourist hotels. She also recalled early opposition from older doctors who ...

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Woman With Transplanted Uterus Gives Birth, the First in the U.S.

Dr. Liza Johannesson, a uterus transplant surgeon who left the Swedish team to join Baylor’s group, said the birth in Dallas was particularly important because it showed that success was not limited to the hospital in Gothenburg. Photo The baby’s mother had been born without a uterus. The baby was delivered by a scheduled cesarean section. Credit Baylor University Medical ...

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Philippines Suspends Dengue Shots After Drug Firm’s Warning

Mr. Duque said that, with an average of 200,000 people infected with dengue every year in the Philippines, vaccination was “essential.” He said that the Department of Health would be stepping up its monitoring efforts to ensure public safety and that the department’s legal division was studying what to do with the Sanofi contract and how to deal with the ...

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Without Obamacare Mandate, ‘You Open the Floodgates’ for Skimpy Health Plans

While repeal supporters argue that people would benefit by having the choice to buy less expensive plans, state regulators have been cracking down on rogue agents who have misled customers about what such inexpensive plans cover or more important don’t. Graphic Millions Pay the Obamacare Penalty Instead of Buying Insurance. Who Are They? The Senate Republican tax bill includes the ...

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Ban on Teflon Chemical Tied to Fewer Low-Weight Babies

Photo Banning a chemical used to make Teflon led to a sharp decrease in pregnancy-related problems. Perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, had been used in many consumer products, including nonstick cookware, food packaging, electronics and carpets. The chemical was linked to a range of health problems, including low-weight births. Beginning in 2003, its use was gradually phased out in the United ...

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Trauma May Have Fallout Over Generations

Photo The daughters of women exposed to childhood trauma are at increased risk for serious psychiatric disorders, a new study concludes. Researchers studied 46,877 Finnish children who were evacuated to Sweden during World War II, between 1940 and 1944. They tracked the health of their 93,391 male and female offspring born from 1950 to 2010. The study, in JAMA Psychiatry, ...

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As Walmart Buys Online Retailers, Their Health Benefits Suffer

Walmart says the share of its employees eligible for company-sponsored coverage, and of those choosing it, is slightly above the industry norm. But the health benefits it offers in its online operations appear to be inferior to those of many e-commerce competitors. At Bonobos, an online men’s wear retailer that Walmart agreed to buy in June for $310 million, workers ...

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Tokyo, Once a Cigarette Haven, Could Finally Kick Out the Smokers

But more recently, the rest of the world’s no-smoking culture has spread to Japan. As more people have grown aware of the health hazards, the number of smokers in Japan has dropped sharply, according to data from the cigarette maker Japan Tobacco. And an increasing number of employers, restaurant owners and public facilities throughout the country have voluntarily banned cigarettes ...

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Cities That Never Sleep Are Shaped by Sunrise and Sunset

Photo The Promenade des Anglais at sunset in Nice, France. Even in artificially-lit urban areas, people are active longer in the summer and less so in winter, a study of city-dwellers in southern Europe found. Credit Eric Gaillard/Reuters Long after the sun has gone down, the electric lights keep blazing. That might suggest that most humans aren’t as influenced by ...

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Abnormal Proteins Discovered in Skin of Patients With Rare Brain Disease

They deteriorate mentally, weaken, move uncontrollably, and may become blind and unable to speak. The disease belongs to the same class of brain disorders as mad-cow disease. The findings do not mean that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be transmitted by touch or casual contact, said the senior author of the study, Dr. Wen-Quan Zou, at Case Western University School of Medicine. ...

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