Health

Mathilde Krim, Mobilizing Force in an AIDS Crusade, Dies at 91

The virus that causes AIDS is spread by many vectors: through sex, needle-sharing among drug users and accidental needle sticks among medical personnel, as well as through blood transfusions and from mother to infant during pregnancy or breast feeding. In Africa, where the disease originated and where it is most widespread, most transmission is through heterosexual sex. In the early ...

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After Surgery in the Womb, a Baby Kicks Up Hope

On Sept. 27, as a six-month-old fetus, he underwent experimental surgery while still in his mother’s womb to treat a severe form of spina bifida, in which the tissue that should enclose and protect the spinal column does not form properly. The condition leaves the spine open with nerves exposed, and they sustain damage that can leave a child incontinent ...

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Trump Administration Says States May Impose Work Requirements for Medicaid

In a speech to state Medicaid officials in November, Ms. Verma indicated that the Trump administration would be receptive to work requirements and other conservative policy ideas to reshape Medicaid. And she criticized the Obama administration, saying it had focused on increasing Medicaid enrollment rather than helping people move out of poverty and into jobs. “Believing that community engagement requirements ...

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C.D.C. Postpones Session Preparing Us for Nuclear War

Photo An air raid drill in a school in Baltimore in 1951. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has postponed a session on nuclear attack preparedness that was planned for next week. Credit Associated Press The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has decided to postpone its session on nuclear attack preparedness next week. Much attention had been drawn ...

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Inside the Global Relay Race to Deliver Moly-99

Countless things can go wrong, starting with the first step. The worldwide supply of moly-99 relies on a fleet of government-subsidized nuclear research reactors built mostly during the Khrushchev-Eisenhower era. Regular maintenance and major repairs can shutter the reactors, sometimes for months, and so-called “scrams” — caused by anything from a hiccup in a reactor’s cooling system to an errant ...

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A Greener, More Healthful Place to Work

Levels of the stress hormone cortisol tend to be higher in enclosed spaces like office cubicles that are artificially lit and deprived of outside views. Poor ventilation — which is common in many older office buildings — raises the levels of carbon dioxide, which studies have shown can impair cognitive performance and dampen mood. Photo Architecture with our biology in ...

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R.S.V.? She Hadn’t Heard of It. Then Her Child Was Hospitalized.

What is R.S.V.? Every winter, R.S.V. becomes a common and potentially serious illness, said Dr. Ethan S. Wiener, associate chief of pediatric emergency medicine at N.Y.U. Langone Health. While it affects both children and adults, it is most dangerous — and can even be fatal — in babies who are born prematurely and people with weak immune systems, heart disease ...

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What a $4,000 Treadmill Means for the Future of Gadgets

Peloton does not sell just a simple piece of hardware. Instead, the company spent tens of millions of dollars creating an inviting experience, complete with brand-ambassador celebrities and high-end retail locations. At the core of its business is a beguiling online service: Get on the bike, turn on the screen, and you are instantly connected with live fitness classes tailored ...

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When the Lung Cancer Patient Climbs Mountains

Andy, 61, of Ipswich, Mass., had a window of good health, a honeymoon of indeterminate time during which he could resume the activities he loved. He played in his coffeehouse band, traveled and took long bike rides up the coast. He also accepted a friend’s invitation to climb in Nepal. Photo Jan and Andy Lindsay take a tea break in ...

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A Mummified Child’s Remains Show Signs of a Modern Scourge

The mummified child, who died at two years old, was buried in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples during the 16th century. The researchers who have worked there acknowledge some of the emotional challenges to studying the toddler’s remains. “There’s this hollowness yet this ghostlike pain still there which is fascinating from a scientific perspective but horrific from ...

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