AT&T, North Korea, Angela Merkel: Your Monday Evening Briefing


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Tom Brenner/ The New York Times

3. The floodgates are still open. A second woman said Senator Al Franken groped her in 2010 — while her husband was taking a photo of them. Unlike the first accusation, this episode involves Mr. Franken’s time in office.

PBS halted distribution of Charlie Rose’s interview program and CBS News suspended him following a report by The Washington Post that eight women are accusing him of unwanted advances and inappropriate behavior. And The Times suspended a White House correspondent, Glenn Thrush, after he was accused of sexual misconduct.

Here’s our updated graphic of at least 30 men who have been accused since the Harvey Weinstein scandal broke.

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Wally Fong/Associated Press

4. Charles Manson, one of the most notorious killers of the 20th century, died Sunday. At 83, he had spent most of his life behind bars on convictions in nine murders with which he had hoped to start a race war.

Here’s what became of the members of his murderous band of young drifters, the so-called Manson family, whose victims included the actress Sharon Tate. And this video examines Mr. Manson’s peculiar influence on pop culture.

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Markus Schreiber/Associated Press

5. Germany is locked in a political crisis that is sending tremors across Europe.

The breakdown of talks to form a coalition government raised fresh doubts about the staying power of Chancellor Angela Merkel. She said she was hopeful about forming a majority government — but would prefer to go through new elections rather than try to lead a minority government.

“This is uncharted territory since 1949,” one analyst said. “Not only is this not going to go away soon, there is no clear path out.”

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Ben Curtis/Associated Press

6. Zimbabwe’s president, Robert Mugabe, ignored an ultimatum from his own party demanding that he step down.

Parliament is now under pressure to impeach him, a process that could extend broad national frustration for weeks. Above, a cafe-goers in Harare watched Mr. Mugabe deliver a speech on Sunday.

Here’s how Mr. Mugabe, the only leader Zimbabwe has known since its independence in 1980, lost power in just days. And a veteran reporter who was there when Mr. Mugabe took over sees disturbing parallels with the current moment of hope and joy.

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Daniel Berehulak for The New York Times

7. With the “disappeared” in Mexico’s drug war numbering in the tens of thousands, some families are taking up the search for loved ones on their own. Above, Vicky Delgadillo and Carlos Saldaña, who are searching for clues about their missing children, in Xalapa, Mexico.

Separately, a Border Patrol agent was killed and his partner seriously injured over the weekend while on patrol in West Texas. The authorities called it an attack. We’ll be updating our article with details as we get them.

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Larry W. Smith/European Pressphoto Agency

8. Nebraska regulators approved the Keystone XL pipeline, removing the last major obstacle to the project. But they assigned it an alternative route, and the pipeline company, TransCanada, said it would have to evaluate how to proceed.

The decision came four days after another pipeline operated by the same company spilled 210,000 gallons of oil in neighboring South Dakota. Opponents said that episode underscored the risks that pipelines pose for the environment and nearby communities.

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Disney/Pixar

9. The new Pixar movie “Coco,” opens in U.S. theaters this week, and it’s breaking some barriers.

It tells the story of Miguel Rivera, a 12-year-old Mexican boy who dreams of becoming a famous singer. But his family disapproves, leading to a fateful act of rebellion during Día de los Muertos, the festive holiday that honors the dead. Miguel is the first minority lead in a Pixar movie.

The non-Latino director, Lee Unkrich, took pains to make sure the film was accurate in its representation of Mexico. It seems it’s paid off: “Coco” has become Mexico’s highest-grossing animated film ever since it was released there last month.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America

10. Finally, it’s almost Thanksgiving. Let us help you make it great.

Our Smarter Living team put together a comprehensive guide on how to prepare for travel, host, cook, select wine, be a good guest, argue without rancor and other relevant tips.

Above, two candidates for this year’s presidential pardon, Drumstick and Wishbone, met the press in Washington.

Have a great night.

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Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.

And don’t miss Your Morning Briefing, posted weekdays at 6 a.m. Eastern, and Your Weekend Briefing, posted at 6 a.m. Sundays.

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