A Wearable Vibrator for Couples


After dozens of prototypes, they came up with their design: an egg-shaped vibrator made of medical-grade silicone that attaches to a woman’s nether region by means of two wings. Not only can the device be operated hands-free, it is also designed in a way that does not interfere with a couple’s intimacy.

“We wanted to stimulate women with something nonobtrusive so you can look in your partner’s eyes,” Ms. Fine said.

They called the device Eva and after raising $575,000 on Indiegogo in 2014, they went to market in early 2015. To date, they have sold over 65,000 units at $105 a pop.

Eva, which is manufactured by a company called Dame Products, is among a recent surge of products that embraces feminism as part of its marketing. Like the “period-proof” underwear brand Thinx, it telegraphs a pro-women identity.

Photo

Alexandra Fine, left, and Janet Lieberman, the founders of Dame Products.

Credit
Danny Ghitis for The New York Times

“Our continuing mission: to design well-engineered sex toys, to heighten intimacy, and to openly empower the sexual experiences of womankind,” reads the company’s website. The message is amplified through Dame’s Instagram account, filled with posts like a pink neon sign that reads “My Body My Business.”

The founders also have the lingo down. “Our mission is to close the pleasure gap,” Ms. Fine said during a recent tour of the company’s office in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. “We want to fight any inequality between the sexes, but especially when it comes to sexual practices. We want women to claim their sexual pleasure and own it.”

Kristina Monllos, a reporter at Adweek who covers marketing innovation and consumer trends, said that Eva and Thinx appeal to millennial consumers who want ethically and socially-minded products developed for their generation.

“Young people across the gender spectrum are creating brands that live up to and express their own political ideals,” Ms. Monllos said. “We’re seeing this millennial version now where it’s a very stylized aesthetic coupled with these feminist, pro-women ideals.”

Ms. Lieberman and Ms. Fine are hoping that their cheerily designed vibrators will help sex toys shed some of their seedier connotations.

“We fall into this really weird space between gag gift, pornography, medical device, health and wellness device and tech gadget,” Ms. Lieberman said. “We hope to change that.”

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